Skip to Navigation
share:

Health Insurance Coverage

Description: 

Health insurance data are collected from people (health insurance consumers) in the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS), and in the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Reports and tables for the nation and states are available from the CPS. Only national estimates are available from the SIPP prior to the 2004 Panel. Both the CPS and SIPP surveys produce public-use data sets allowing users to tabulate the data themselves. While the Census Bureau does not publish data based on information collected from health insurance providers, it does collect employer health insurance data annually for the insurance component of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey, an annual survey conducted for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

The 2005 and 2006 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) data were revised in March 2007 to improve the consistency of estimates for the insured and uninsured as part of ongoing efforts to improve the quality of Census Bureau data. Because the data after the revision is not consistent with earlier data, the Census Bureau introduced a new historical series (HIA-1 to HIA-8) and discontinued the original series. The data for 1999 to 2003 presented in these tables (from ASEC's 2000 to 2004) were revised using an approximation method for consistency with the revision to the 2004 and 2005 estimates (2005 and 2006 ASEC’s).

Data Source: 

U.S. Census, Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/cpstables/032011/health/toc.htm

Data Quality Comments: 

Across the US, no factor other than geographic isolation has a greater impact on health care access than health insurance coverage.  

The Census Bureau's Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program produces estimates of health insurance coverage rates for states and all counties. In July 2005, SAHIE released the first nation-wide set of county-level estimates on the number of people without health insurance coverage for all ages and those under 18 years old. Later this year, SAHIE will release 2005 estimates of health insurance coverage by age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, and income categories at the state-level and by age, sex, and income categories at the county-level.

Noted Changes to Yearly Data Collection Methodology:
1987 - Implementation of a new March Current Population Survey (CPS) processing system.       
1991 - Figures are revised to correct for nice omitted weights from the original March 1992 CPS file.          
1992 - Implementation of Census 1990 based population controls.                               
1993 - Data collection method changed from paper and pencil to computer-assisted interviewing.                 
1994 - Health insurance questions were redesigned.  Increases in estimates of employment-based and military health care coverage may be partially due to questionnaire changes.  Overall coverage estimates were not affected.
1997 - Beginning with the March 1998 CPS, people with no coverage other than access to Indian Health Service are no longer considered covered by health insurance; instead, they are considered to be uninsured. The effect of this change on the overall estimates of health insurance coverage is negligible; however, the decrease in the number of people covered by Medicaid may be partially due to this change.
1999 - Estimates reflect the results of follow-up verification questions and of Census 2000 based population controls.
2000 - Implementation of a 28,000 household sample expansion.                                 
2004 - These estimates from the 2005 ASEC were revised based on improvements to the algorithm that assigned coverage to dependents, and there was an adjustment to the weights.

iconPercent of Arizona Population with Health Insurance

Loading Data...

iconHealth Insurance Coverage in Arizona

Loading Data...

iconTotal Number of Nursing Homes and Beds

Loading Data...

Visualization Notes:

The National Ombudsman Reporting System collects data on the number of nursing home beds in Arizona, as well as nationally.  Findings show that the U.S. average per state shows more than twice as many nursing homes and beds as Arizona. Supply has remained fairly constant but has shown a slight decline over time both nationally and statewide.

iconTotal Number of Assisted Living Facilities and Beds

Loading Data...

Visualization Notes:

The National Ombudsman Reporting System collects data on the number of assisted living beds in Arizona (defined as boarding homes). This graph shows that Arizona has almost twice as many assisted living facilities and beds as the national average with the number of beds for both increasing over time. Arizona data for the total number of boarding homes is incorrect for 2001 and 2002.

Data Source

U.S. Census, Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/cpstables/032011/health/toc.htm