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special report Publications

  • Publication Preview
    Special Report
    Author(s):
    John A. Shoemaker MPH
    Linda Manning PhD
    Crystal Ramos BS
    Published: Friday, September 30, 2016

    An estimated 30,893 Arizona families were served by State-administered home visiting programs during the State’s 2015 fiscal year (SFY2015). This is a 7.4% increase over the estimate of 28,776 families served for SFY2014. The Arizona Early Childhood Home Visiting Index increased to 30.4% for SFY2015, up from 27.0% for SFY 2014.

  • Publication Preview
    Special Report
    Author(s):
    Anthony Evans PhD
    John A. Shoemaker MPH
    Published: Friday, February 5, 2016

    This study estimates that Arizona receives $1.87 in benefits for every $1 collectively invested in evidence-based early childhood home visitation programs. The analysis was implemented by the Seidman Research Institute, in association with the Morrison Institute for Public Policy, both at Arizona State University.

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    Special Report
    Author(s):
    John Shoemaker MPH
    Linda Manning PhD
    Graciela Macia MSW MPA
    Keiran Vitek BA BAS
    Published: Wednesday, December 16, 2015

    As in most states, home visiting in Arizona began as a patchwork of programs that grew independently of each other within each State agency. At present, the State’s home visiting system remains divided among the agencies, each program has its own administration and reporting requirements, and there is no central registry of home visiting data. For this reason, ADHS engaged the Morrison Institute for Public Policy in early 2014 to estimate the scope of the State’s home visiting system.

  • Publication Preview
    Special Report
    Author(s):
    Erica McFadden, Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona State University
    Madelaine Adelman, Justice and Social Inquiry, Arizona State University
    Published: Tuesday, April 2, 2013

    Bullying and violence in K-12 schools have been in the policy spotlight in Arizona for almost a decade. However, current indicators and recent traumatic events show that a range of anti-social behaviors on school campuses remain a major threat to student well-being and learning.

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    Special Report
    Author(s):
    Oscar Jiménez-Castellanos
    Mary Carol Combs
    David Martínez
    Laura Gómez
    Published: Wednesday, March 13, 2013

    Last year marked the 20th anniversary of Flores v. Arizona, the original lawsuit regarding English learners in Arizona, but the task of providing efficient and effective English Language Learner (ELL) programs in Arizona remains unresolved. At stake overall, educators, business leaders and economic experts agree, is no less than the state’s future economic, health, social and education standing. Policies that affect ELL students impact all Arizonans. This brief examines the legal history, changing funding formulas and ELL student achievement.